Wednesday, August 9, 2017

hausoftruecrime:
““I Want To Kill People And Commit Suicide” - The Parker Middle School Shooting.
The epidemic of school shootings that plagued America during the 1990’s reached a horrific peak in the early months of 1998, when four fatal attacks...
hausoftruecrime:
“I Want To Kill People And Commit Suicide” - The Parker Middle School Shooting.
The epidemic of school shootings that plagued America during the 1990’s reached a horrific peak in the early months of 1998, when four fatal attacks occured within months of each other. While the communities of West Paducah, Pearl, and Jonesboro still reeled from the senseless loss of their children, tragedy was about to strike the small town of Edinboro, Pennsylvania.
Fourteen-year-old Andrew Wurst was part of a graduating class attending a dance, at a restaurant near Parker Middle School on April 23, 1998. As other students danced to “My Heart Will Go On”, Wurst drew a .25 pistol from his waistband and shot dead teacher John Gillette, who had told Wurst to stop loitering outside. He then walked to the dancefloor and fired aimlessly into a crowd of terrified teenagers, wounding three. One witness later recalled that Wurst had smiled as he pulled the trigger.
James Strand, the owner of the venue, retrieved his shotgun and ordered Wurst to stand down. He led the teenager outside and searched him, finding bullets and marijuana in one pocket, and a fork in his sock. After an eleven minute standoff, Wurst was handed over to the police.
Andrew was prickly under questioning, but soon confessed to stealing the handgun from his father, with the intention of committing suicide at the dance. He claimed to not have targeted anyone in particular, though some of his friends would refute this. In the years preceding the shooting Wurst had shown signs of depression and aggression, and he often drank whiskey or smoked pot to cope with his dysfunctional home life.
Andrew Wurst was charged with the murder of John Gillette and with intent to kill. He was sentenced to sixty years in prison, with a thirty year non-parole period.

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